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Urban compost @ Paris 2.0

Wednesday 23 September 2009, by quattrolibri

I was invited to speak at Paris 2.0 this morning.
 
Here is the video (the presentation of Urban Compost starts around the 66th minute)
 
 
 

Our roundtable focused on the impact of a place on innovation: physical or virtual, or both.

 
Great talk by Birgitta Ralston about Transplant in Norway, who explained how her team created and further develops a home for innovation by the shore of a fjord, about an hour away from Oslo by plane. She insisted on the presence of a Materiautheque (a library of materials) and of a wide range of resources, from a kitchen to open exhibition rooms for Artists.
 
Glad that the usual focus on technology was balanced by a growing emphasis on territories (territories of tomorrow), and delighted to see Phosphore, Eiffage’s project, in full motion.
 

 

The closing round was most interesting: what is your favourite place to innovate?

 
from memory, here are some of the replies:
 
  • an exotic place, to step back and think 
  • a secluded place, far far away (a salar in South America)
  • a street, to meet people and seek things to improve, in an environment we know well
  • anywhere, technology is here to serve us, and should not be a barrier
  • in a place where cultures can meet and thrive, as we need a European way of innovating
  • in a place where you can test and try things
 
Hint: this is my choice.
 
 

I took “urban compost” as an opportunity to link several things we’re working on at the moment:

 
  • improve the resilience of territories : how territories can respond to shocks and meet the needs of their inhabitants (food, housing, local transport, crafts)
  • avoid wasting food: taking inspiration from the conclusions of Tristram Stuart’s research, who published WASTE, uncovering the global food scandal earlier this year.
  • build short-circuits and innovative distribution mechanisms, taking advantage of current mobility flows in the city.
 
Expect more articles on these topics in the coming months and more links on our research feeds: www.delicious.com/quattrolibri. Contact us if you want to find out more.
 
Please buy and read Tristram Stuart’s book :‘Waste: Uncovering the Global Food Scandal’, £9.99, published by Penguin. To buy the book for £7.99, call the FT ordering service on 0870 429 5884 or go to www.ft.com/bookshop. ISBN: 9780141036342
 
 


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